Creativity with Purpose
2 years ago
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adwriter:

CoffeeCompany WiFi headlines.

Holland’s largest chain of coffee shops is called CoffeCompany. They wanted to attract more students, so they installed WiFi in some of its stores near universities. The problem is, lots of students just come into the store for the WiFi but hardly look at the menu.

So CoffeeCompany decided to move the store’s menu into the WiFi menu of customers’ laptops. They periodically changed the wireless network name from the normal “CoffeeCompany” to hard-selling headlines. So as students looked for a network, they found menu lines such as “mmm….YummyMuffinsOnly1,99″

Agency: They Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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2 years ago
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Coffee for a Cause - thanks!
We’re back into the swing of a busy Friday at this stage - but we didn’t want to get to the weekend without thanking the team at Java Republic for hosting our Coffee for a Cause event this morning. (You can click on the image above to see more photos from this morning.)
We enjoyed great company, some tasty breakfast snacks and an energizing history of the brand from founder David McKernan. We also had a truly amazing “cupping” experience: Under the watchful eye of Gerry Hughes, their Coffee Quality Manager, we were treated to a blind tasting of Kopi Luwak - the most expensive coffee in the world. Costing well over $600 a pound, these beans are harvested from the droppings of a mountain lion in Indonesia that likes to munch on berries from the coffee tree. Apparently the big cat’s digestive system delivers a unique fermentation benefit to this hard-to-find coffee!
Thanks to everybody who made it out to The Roastery, with a particular appreciation to Coty Ireland and Java Republic for supplying goodie bags. We’ll be carrying out more of these coffee mornings to continue the fund-raising efforts: So if you couldn’t make it this time, keep an eye out for the next one - and if you want to donate, please click here.

Coffee for a Cause - thanks!

We’re back into the swing of a busy Friday at this stage - but we didn’t want to get to the weekend without thanking the team at Java Republic for hosting our Coffee for a Cause event this morning. (You can click on the image above to see more photos from this morning.)

We enjoyed great company, some tasty breakfast snacks and an energizing history of the brand from founder David McKernan. We also had a truly amazing “cupping” experience: Under the watchful eye of Gerry Hughes, their Coffee Quality Manager, we were treated to a blind tasting of Kopi Luwak - the most expensive coffee in the world. Costing well over $600 a pound, these beans are harvested from the droppings of a mountain lion in Indonesia that likes to munch on berries from the coffee tree. Apparently the big cat’s digestive system delivers a unique fermentation benefit to this hard-to-find coffee!

Thanks to everybody who made it out to The Roastery, with a particular appreciation to Coty Ireland and Java Republic for supplying goodie bags. We’ll be carrying out more of these coffee mornings to continue the fund-raising efforts: So if you couldn’t make it this time, keep an eye out for the next one - and if you want to donate, please click here.

3 years ago
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Coffee for a Cause
For as long as we’ve known Java Republic, they’ve always aimed to better the lives of those who grow their coffee. This month sees Coffee for a Cause - a fundraising campaign to bring clean water to over 10,000 people in Ethiopia. We donated our time to brand and communicate the campaign - and we’re hosting a coffee morning at The Roastery next Friday. If you like great coffee for a good cause, click on the link on this page to get a chance for an invite.
Please spread the word!

Coffee for a Cause

For as long as we’ve known Java Republic, they’ve always aimed to better the lives of those who grow their coffee. This month sees Coffee for a Cause - a fundraising campaign to bring clean water to over 10,000 people in Ethiopia. We donated our time to brand and communicate the campaign - and we’re hosting a coffee morning at The Roastery next Friday. If you like great coffee for a good cause, click on the link on this page to get a chance for an invite.

Please spread the word!

3 years ago
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Starbucks continues the trend towards stripped-down brand identities

It’s been all over the web since yesterday: Starbucks announced an evolved brand identity - with everything removed apart from their “siren” symbol.

Starbucks

Created by Lippincott and Starbucks own in-house design team, this follows a growing trend towards minimal consumer brand identities: From Pepsi’s new look in 2009 - noteworthy for possibly the most ludicrous rationale ever - through to less successful attempts by Tropicana and Gap in 2010. Not forgetting two of the world’s most successful brands - Apple and Nike - who have long since dropped their name from brand identifiers.

The Starbucks news follows on nicely from a blog-post we spotted in December from the Antrepo agency - where they imagined how some well-known consumer brands could benefit from minimalist packaging design.

Antrepo

It all raises some interesting thoughts: First of all, Starbucks went about their change with more customer-sensitivity than either Tropicana or Gap: They’ve announced the change three months ahead of launch, and (most cleverly) they’re showing the new mark applied to their ubiquitous coffee cups, where it already looks at home.

But the key reason why we believe Starbucks can take this kind of bold approach is because of the broad brand-communication canvas they work with: Most consumers encounter the brand in the context of their coffee shops, where their warm, hyper-kinetic and multi-layered visual language can still run riot. This new brand identity is simply the identifier to punctuate a richly-expressed brand environment. It’s the badge in front of the car, rather than the car itself.

That’s why Tropicana didn’t work - and why a super-minimal Pringles pack wouldn’t sell either: Consumer brands have a tiny piece of on-shelf real estate to work with: They need to convey all the values and character of their brand in their packaging in order to create recognition, appeal - and to prompt a purchase.

Unless you have Pepsi’s advertising budget, Starbuck’s physical presence, or a target audience that values visual restraint, consumer brands will always need to strike a careful balance between complexity and simplicity.

4 years ago
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Thanks to our clients at Java Republic, we attended the  coffee-morning launch of the Special Olympics fund-raising day today -  you can visit their site to donate online.
Whilst there, we met a  kindred spirit in Willie O’Reilly, the CEO of Today FM. As we clutched  our caffeinated kick-start to the day, we chatted about the one office  expense that couldn’t be cut: Decent coffee.
Both DesignTactics  and Today FM are customers for Java Republic’s office coffee service:  Although recent times had required savings to be made in other areas,  the coffee still flows for free.
Willie had (briefly) considered  asking coffee drinkers to make a voluntary contribution for their fix -  but decided the potential benefits were outweighed by the hassle and  uncertainty of trying this out.
Interestingly, this kind of  “honour payment” system has become well-researched in recent years,  thanks to the Freakonomics team. In 2004, they ran a great article (PDF) (NYT link) about  a office-bagel service run by a retired economist: He offered a very  successful service delivering bagels to busy offices in Washington, DC -  yet his customers were under no obligation to pay. Beside each basket  of bagels was a cash box with a simple price list, asking those who took  the bagels to pay up.
Being a retired economist, he took a lot of  interest in his figures - and soon developed a great set of data on how  honest people really are. The full article makes for a great read, but  here’s some noteworthy points:
More punters paid up when they  knew the provider directly - his best collection rate was in the office  where he used work.
While the theft of bagels was as low as  10-15%, he discovered (pretty quickly) that he had to collect cash in a  sealed box; the temptation to pilfer cash from an open container was  greater than the lure of pilfered bagels. And no - the cash box itself  almost never gets stolen.
Those higher-up the corporate latter steal more bagels than  their lesser-salaried colleagues.
Businesses with good morale  have the best payment rates - and smaller offices have far better  payment rates than large organisations.
When the economy goes  down and unemployment goes up, there is a counterintuitive increase in  honest payments. (Feelings of guilt amongst those still working?)
And finally - for the day that’s in it - when the weather is  good, he gets closer to a perfect match between bagels sold and bagels  paid for.
Have a great weekend!

Thanks to our clients at Java Republic, we attended the coffee-morning launch of the Special Olympics fund-raising day today - you can visit their site to donate online.

Whilst there, we met a kindred spirit in Willie O’Reilly, the CEO of Today FM. As we clutched our caffeinated kick-start to the day, we chatted about the one office expense that couldn’t be cut: Decent coffee.

Both DesignTactics and Today FM are customers for Java Republic’s office coffee service: Although recent times had required savings to be made in other areas, the coffee still flows for free.

Willie had (briefly) considered asking coffee drinkers to make a voluntary contribution for their fix - but decided the potential benefits were outweighed by the hassle and uncertainty of trying this out.

Interestingly, this kind of “honour payment” system has become well-researched in recent years, thanks to the Freakonomics team. In 2004, they ran a great article (PDF) (NYT link) about a office-bagel service run by a retired economist: He offered a very successful service delivering bagels to busy offices in Washington, DC - yet his customers were under no obligation to pay. Beside each basket of bagels was a cash box with a simple price list, asking those who took the bagels to pay up.

Being a retired economist, he took a lot of interest in his figures - and soon developed a great set of data on how honest people really are. The full article makes for a great read, but here’s some noteworthy points:

  • More punters paid up when they knew the provider directly - his best collection rate was in the office where he used work.
  • While the theft of bagels was as low as 10-15%, he discovered (pretty quickly) that he had to collect cash in a sealed box; the temptation to pilfer cash from an open container was greater than the lure of pilfered bagels. And no - the cash box itself almost never gets stolen.
  • Those higher-up the corporate latter steal more bagels than their lesser-salaried colleagues.
  • Businesses with good morale have the best payment rates - and smaller offices have far better payment rates than large organisations.
  • When the economy goes down and unemployment goes up, there is a counterintuitive increase in honest payments. (Feelings of guilt amongst those still working?)
  • And finally - for the day that’s in it - when the weather is good, he gets closer to a perfect match between bagels sold and bagels paid for.

Have a great weekend!

4 years ago
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Crowd-sourcing the perfect coffee cup

Fast Company brought this to my attention: Betacup is a U.S. start-up aiming to revolutionize the design and materials of the ubiquitous take-out coffee cup. Their objective is (presumably) profit as well as sustainability, and they’re crowd-sourcing the creative and industrial design process. It’s the "Your Country, Your Call" for the caffeinated set!

4 years ago
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Harvard  Professor Makes Inhalable Coffee
Although this is notionally a blog about branding and creativity, we find that coffee is a very necessary tool to succeed at both. I’m very suspicious that this device could deliver the sensory experience of a great espresso-based beverage… what next - caffeine patches?
Update: Here’s another article, with a video…

Harvard Professor Makes Inhalable Coffee

Although this is notionally a blog about branding and creativity, we find that coffee is a very necessary tool to succeed at both. I’m very suspicious that this device could deliver the sensory experience of a great espresso-based beverage… what next - caffeine patches?

Update: Here’s another article, with a video…

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4 years ago
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We’re always keeping an eye out for creative ideas to make the coffee experience even better… This one would work a treat, once you’re in arms reach of a radiator!
As winter’s cold creeps in, we all revel in the little things to keep cozy. The Natural Wave is ceramic plate that fits over an old school radiator. The heated plate keeps your drinks and snacks warm without having to use additional power and energy like a microwave or oven. Pretty ingenious and if anything, it makes those old rusty radiators look a lot better.

We’re always keeping an eye out for creative ideas to make the coffee experience even better… This one would work a treat, once you’re in arms reach of a radiator!

As winter’s cold creeps in, we all revel in the little things to keep cozy. The Natural Wave is ceramic plate that fits over an old school radiator. The heated plate keeps your drinks and snacks warm without having to use additional power and energy like a microwave or oven. Pretty ingenious and if anything, it makes those old rusty radiators look a lot better.

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4 years ago
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Alternative Xmas prezzie for coffee fans: One-off hand-drawn styrafoam cups: Via @brainpicker

Alternative Xmas prezzie for coffee fans: One-off hand-drawn styrafoam cups: Via @brainpicker

4 years ago
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At Dublin CEB event as David McKernan (Java Republic) inspires entepreneurs- & talks about our brand.

At Dublin CEB event as David McKernan (Java Republic) inspires entepreneurs- & talks about our brand.

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